Pensacola's Future:

Safety.
Jobs.
Housing.

Pensacola's Future:

Safety.
Jobs.
Housing.

As Mayor D.C. will focus his efforts on three important issues for the future of Pensacola:

Public Safety, Affordable Housing, and Job creation through Economic Development.

PUBLIC

Safety will always be my first priority as mayor. Without it, our community, its vibrancy, its economic development opportunity and its tourism erodes.

AFFORDABLE

While public safety is our largest investment as a city, people living in Pensacola is our largest revenue stream. Ad Valorem taxes and franchise fees – all created by people living here – make up almost half of our general fund revenue.

JOB

I have spent a significant part of my life growing my own business and then lifting up others in the Pensacola area who want to start a company of their own.

Safety

Safety will always be my first priority as mayor. Without it, our community, its vibrancy, its economic development opportunity and its tourism erodes.  

Public safety is our single largest general fund investment: $35.5 million, or almost 61% of the fund.  

That means supporting our police and fire departments and aiding in the effort to maintain and improve the percentage of solved cases and response times to ultimately lower the crime rate. We will be at the forefront of key performance indicators to show our effort to the city taxpayers.  

To hit those key metrics we want, we need to build trust and cooperation between police, fire and the mayor’s office. We need to put our experts in the best positions to be successful and ensure they have the tools and equipment to do their jobs.

I’m thrilled to have the support of key law enforcement officials including

Escambia County Sheriff Chip Simmons and Deputy Sheriff Tommi Lyter. Lyter and Simmons spent a combined 8 years as Chief of the Pensacola Police Department.

Safety will always be my first priority as mayor. Without it, our community, its vibrancy, its economic development opportunity and its tourism erodes.  

Public safety is our single largest general fund investment: $35.5 million, or almost 61% of the fund.  

That means supporting our police and fire departments and aiding in the effort to maintain and improve the percentage of solved cases and response times to ultimately lower the crime rate. We will be at the forefront of key performance indicators to show our effort to the city taxpayers.  

To hit those key metrics we want, we need to build trust and cooperation between police, fire and the mayor’s office. We need to put our experts in the best positions to be successful and ensure they have the tools and equipment to do their jobs.

I’m thrilled to have the support of key law enforcement officials including

Escambia County Sheriff Chip Simmons and Deputy Sheriff Tommi Lyter. Lyter and Simmons spent a combined 8 years as Chief of the Pensacola Police Department.

Housing

While public safety is our largest investment as a city, people living in Pensacola is our largest revenue stream. Ad Valorem taxes and franchise fees – all created by people living here – make up almost half of our general fund revenue.

But we’re facing the same problem we’ve seen across the country – it’s becoming increasingly difficult to live in Pensacola affordably.
What does that mean? For both our short term and long-term growth, we need to look for more opportunities to house people right here in Pensacola.

I have a two-step plan to attack our housing shortage and thicken our city: First, we have a plan to increase inventory overall. We’ll take a look a zoning and land development code reform to help the ability to increase dwellings overall.

The second step is a plan to focus heavily on creating housing opportunities for teachers, first responders and nurses – the people who protect, save and enrich our citizens’ lives in Pensacola. We’ll make intentional steps including leveraging city-owned property and starting public/private partnerships to create housing opportunities for these vital people in our workforce.

While public safety is our largest investment as a city, people living in Pensacola is our largest revenue stream. Ad Valorem taxes and franchise fees – all created by people living here – make up almost half of our general fund revenue.

But we’re facing the same problem we’ve seen across the country – it’s becoming increasingly difficult to live in Pensacola affordably.
What does that mean? For both our short term and long-term growth, we need to look for more opportunities to house people right here in Pensacola.

I have a two-step plan to attack our housing shortage and thicken our city: First, we have a plan to increase inventory overall. We’ll take a look a zoning and land development code reform to help the ability to increase dwellings overall.

The second step is a plan to focus heavily on creating housing opportunities for teachers, first responders and nurses – the people who protect, save and enrich our citizens’ lives in Pensacola. We’ll make intentional steps including leveraging city-owned property and starting public/private partnerships to create housing opportunities for these vital people in our workforce.

Jobs

I have spent a significant part of my life growing my own business and then lifting up others in the Pensacola area who want to start a company of their own.

The new battlefront of job creation and economic development is not property or “shovel-ready” land. The new battle is to attract young talented people to live in your community. This is a place where we can improve and achieve what we all want – to

I will focus on “place-based” economic development; When you build a desirable, safe place to live with housing opportunity, young people – who have more remote work flexibility than ever before – will move there. And when you have young talented people in your community, businesses organically want to move in. All of our efforts around business attraction will be rooted in talent attraction.  While our community has become more desirable to live here, our funnel of opportunity is behind in this race with comparable Southern cities and I pledge to catch us up. 

We will focus on community building, talent attraction and business attraction to achieve what we all want – the chance for our children and grandchildren to live and prosper right here at home.

 

I have spent a significant part of my life growing my own business and then lifting up others in the Pensacola area who want to start a company of their own.

The new battlefront of job creation and economic development is not property or “shovel-ready” land. The new battle is to attract young talented people to live in your community. This is a place where we can improve and achieve what we all want – to

I will focus on “place-based” economic development; When you build a desirable, safe place to live with housing opportunity, young people – who have more remote work flexibility than ever before – will move there. And when you have young talented people in your community, businesses organically want to move in. All of our efforts around business attraction will be rooted in talent attraction.  While our community has become more desirable to live here, our funnel of opportunity is behind in this race with comparable Southern cities and I pledge to catch us up. 

We will focus on community building, talent attraction and business attraction to achieve what we all want – the chance for our children and grandchildren to live and prosper right here at home.

 

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